Before a Hurricane

Graphic Showing a man screwing down plywood   To prepare for a hurricane, you should take the following measures:

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Know your surroundings.
  • Learn the elevation level of your property and whether the land is flood-prone. This will help you know how your property will be affected when storm surge or tidal flooding are forecasted. Click here to go to the Shelter and Storm Surge Mapping Tool to determine if your home is in an area that is predicted to flood during a hurricane.
  • Identify levees and dams in your area and determine whether they pose a hazard to you.
  • Learn community hurricane evacuation routes and how to find higher ground. Determine where you would go and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate.
  • Make plans to secure your property:
  • Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install. Tape does not prevent windows from breaking.
  • Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure. This will reduce roof damage.
  • Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
  • Reinforce your garage doors; if wind enters a garage it can cause dangerous and expensive structural damage.
  • Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
  • Determine how and where to secure your boat.
  • Install a generator for emergencies.
  • If in a high-rise building, be prepared to take shelter on or below the 10th floor.
  • Consider building a safe room.

Hurricanes cause heavy rains that can cause extensive flood damage in coastal and inland areas. Everyone is at risk and should consider flood insurance protection. Flood insurance is the only way to financially protect your property or business from flood damage. To learn more about your flooding risk and how to protect yourself and your business, visit the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (NFIP) Web site, www.floodsmart.gov or call 1-800-427-2419. For more detailed information on how you can protect your property, view NFIP’s printer-friendly handout Avoiding Hurricane Damage.

Storm Surge

The greatest potential for loss of life related to a hurricane is from the storm surge!
 
Storm surge is simply water that is pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds swirling around the storm. This advancing surge combines with the normal tides to create the hurricane storm tide, which can increase the mean water level to heights impacting roads, homes and other critical infrastructure. In addition, wind driven waves are superimposed on the storm tide. This rise in water level can cause severe flooding in coastal areas, particularly when the storm tide coincides with the normal high tides. Because much of the United States' densely populated Atlantic and Gulf Coast coastlines lie less than 10 feet above mean sea level, the danger from storm tides is tremendous.
 
The storm surge combined with wave action can cause extensive damage, severely erode beaches and coastal highways. With major storms like Katrina, Camille and Hugo, complete devastation of coastal communities occurred. Many buildings withstand hurricane force winds until their foundations, undermined by erosion, are weakened and fail.

 

Know the Terms

 

Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a hurricane hazard:
 
Tropical Cyclone: A warm-core non-frontal synoptic-scale cyclone, originating over tropical or subtropical waters, with organized deep convection and a closed surface wind circulation about a well-defined center. Once formed, a tropical cyclone is maintained by the extraction of heat energy from the ocean at high temperature and heat export at the low temperatures of the upper troposphere.
 
Tropical Depression: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed (using the U.S. 1-minute average) is 38 mph (33 knot) or less.
 
Tropical Storm: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind speed (using the U.S. 1-minute average) ranges from 39 mph (34 knots) to 73 mph (63 knots).
 
Hurricane: A tropical cyclone in which the maximum sustained surface wind (using the U.S. 1-minute average) is 74 mph (64 knots) or more.
 
Storm Surge: An abnormal rise in sea level accompanying a hurricane or other intense storm, and whose height is the difference between the observed level of the sea surface and the level that would have occurred in the absence of the cyclone. Storm surge is usually estimated by subtracting the normal or astronomic high tide from the observed storm tide.  Storm surge can reach heights well over 20 feet and can span hundreds of miles of coastline.
 
Storm Tide: The actual level of sea water resulting from the astronomic tide combined with the storm surge.
 
Hurricane Warning: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within the specified area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
 
Hurricane Watch: An announcement that hurricane conditions (sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within the specified area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.
 
Tropical Storm Warning
: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected somewhere within the specified area within 36 hours.
 
Tropical Storm Watch: An announcement that tropical storm conditions (sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within the specified area within 48 hours.
 
Short Term Watches and Warnings: These watches/warnings provide detailed information about specific hurricane threats, such as flash floods and tornadoes.


Additional Huricane Planning and Preparation Information

Additional Hurricane Preparedness Resources

Office of Emergency Management Links

Preparedness Resources

SHELTER AND STORM SURGE ZONE MAPPING TOOL

Shelter and Storm Surge Zone Mapping ToolThe Shelter and Storm Surge Zone Mapping Tool will help you find the Red Cross Shelters that are closest to your home and also allow you to determine if your home is in an area that is predicted to flood during a hurricane. Click here to learn more.

 

Emergency Notifications from Suffolk Code Red

SUFFOLK EMERGENCY NOTIFICATIONS - CODE RED

In the event of an impending or actual emergency. Suffolk County will use the Suffolk Code Red System to contact member residents in affected communities. Alerts may include evacuation orders or missing child notifications. The CodeRED system will also be used for general notifications that may include road closures, construction or boil water advisories. Click here to learn more.

 

Emergency Preparedness Registry

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS REGISTRY

The Emergency Preparedness Registry has been established to collect information emergency responders will need to help locate and evacuate people with Special Needs or high risks during an emergency, especially when a family, caregiver or others are unable to help them. Click here to learn more.

 

Suffolk County Emergency Notifications Emergency Preparedness Registry

CONTACT US

Steve Bellone
COUNTY EXECUTIVE

Joseph F. Williams
COMMISSIONER

John G. Jordan Sr.
DEPUTY COMMISSIONER

Ed Schneyer
Director of the Office of Emergency Management

PO BOX 127
YAPHANK, NY
11980-0127
MAIN 631-852-4900
FAX 631-852-4922
SCDFRES@SuffolkCountyny.gov